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County Supervisors Assess If San Diego’s Fire Resources Are Enough

Credit: City of Carlsbad

The Poinsettia fire, fueled by strong Santa Ana winds and extreme drought conditions, burns through a neighborhood in Carlsbad, May 2014.

Audio

Aired 6/16/14

When the Cedar fire destroyed 2,000 homes and killed 15 people in 2003, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors reevaluated the region’s firefighting efforts and invested hundreds of millions to beef up its resources.

When the Cedar fire destroyed 2,000 homes and killed 15 people in 2003, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors reevaluated the region’s firefighting efforts and invested hundreds of millions to beef up its resources. Now, just more than a month after a dozen wildfires scorched the county, the supervisors again must determine if our current fire protections are enough.

As of June 11, 2014, the number of buildings destroyed and damaged by the May fires is as follows:

Destroyed

64 homes (46 single-family houses, 18-unit apartment building)

2 commercial structures

1 church

1 modular building

14 accessory structures

Damaged

14 single-family houses

2 multi-family apartment buildings

2 accessory structures

1 commercial structure

Source: San Diego County Communications Office

Document

Fire Protection Recommendations From Supervisor Jacob

Fire Protection Recommendations From Supervisor Jacob

A memo from County Board of Supervisors Chairwoman ...

The weeklong firestorm in May destroyed at least 64 homes and cost $28.5 million to fight — and fire officials say it's only going to get worse. To be better prepared for the battle, the supervisors Tuesday are re-examining the region’s fire resources.

The board will review the aftermath of last month’s fires and discuss recommendations from board Chairwoman Dianne Jacob. Her suggestions include:

Convene a workshop with elected officials and fire officials at the local, state and federal level, including tribal nations and the military, to develop recommendations on next steps to further enhance fire protection in the San Diego region and set a date for the workshop within 45 days.

Hold a meeting with CAL FIRE, the Sheriff’s Department, tribal nations, and representatives from public land management agencies at the local, state and federal level to standardize policies and regulations during red flag events and extreme fire conditions for consistency throughout the region and report back to the board with recommendations in 90 days.

For example, a red flag restriction could include banning hunting on certain lands when there's a high risk of wildfire.

To weigh in on the suggestions or the issue of San Diego's fire protections, you can submit a comment to the Board of Supervisors ahead of the meeting.

Comments

Avatar for user 'Mmikey'

Mmikey | June 14, 2014 at 7:26 a.m. ― 2 months, 1 week ago

looks like the supervisors have a short memory

http://www.utsandiego.com/uniontrib/20081021/news_1m21super.html

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Avatar for user 'Turk182'

Turk182 | June 14, 2014 at 4:44 p.m. ― 2 months, 1 week ago

If you want an evaluation that might help, leave Dianne Jacob of the review panel! Jacob has no clue when it comes to firefighting. If you folks in the County really want to help yourselves, vote this old hand bag out of office and get someone in office who has a clue. Look no further than LA County, Orange County, Ventura County, Santa Barbra County fire. San Diego has no county fire and has volunteers as firefighters. Vollies have the spirit but not the training and experience. San Diego County is lucky they have not killed a firefighter yet!

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